For Developers

Canvas Kit v7 Upgrade Guide

This guide contains breaking changes in Canvas Kit v7. Please reach out if you have any questions.

Codemod

Please use our codemod package to automatically update your code to work with many of the breaking changes as you upgrade from Canvas Kit v6 to v7:

> npx @workday/canvas-kit-codemod v7 [path]

Note: This codemod only works on .js, .jsx, .ts, and .tsx extensions. You may need to make some manual changes in other file types (.json, .mdx, .md, etc.).

Note: You may need to run your linter after executing the codemod, as its resulting formatting (spacing, quotes, etc.) may not match your project's styling.

Breaking changes handled by this codemod will be marked with a πŸ€–.

Please verify all changes made by the codemod. As a safety precaution, we recommend committing the changes from the codemod as a single isolated commit (separate from other changes) so you can rollback more easily if necessary.

Let us know if you encounter any issues or use cases that we've missed.

General Changes

Dependency Upgrades

We've upgraded to Emotion 11 and React 17 in v7. This allows teams to upgrade to newer versions of Emotion and React without needing to maintain older versions in order to use Canvas Kit.

As part of this upgrade, we've removed use of the /** @jsx jsx */ pragma and css prop within Canvas Kit. See our React 17 discussion and corresponding PR for more information on why we made this change. Consumers may continue to use the css prop.

To use v7, you'll need to upgrade the following dependencies:

  • React 16.14 OR React 17.X for backwards compatibility on JSX transform if you're using Babel or TypeScript to compile code
  • Emotion 11
  • TypeScript 4.1 or higher, if applicable
  • Babel 7.9 or higher, if applicable
  • An Enzyme adapter for React 17, if applicable

We no longer support TypeScript 3.5-3.9. Previously, we used downlevel-dts to support TypeScript 3.5+ while using TypeScript 3.8 features, but downlevel-dts does not support features we use in TypeScript 4.1. TypeScript 4.1 was released in November 2020, and we feel it is time to move forward. Reach out if you experience issues upgrading your TypeScript version. In our experience, TypeScript 4.1 found a few more errors than TypeScript 3.8, but the upgrade was manageable.

Please note that you may also need to update any side effect dependencies or linting packages with this update.

View our React 17 and Emotion 11 discussions to learn more about any gotchas or tips and tricks with these upgrades. And of course, feel free to contribute to the discussion with any questions or learnings of your own!


Model Changes

Guards and Callbacks

We've changed the signature of model event guards and callbacks. In v6, the parameters were in an object. This was a less than ideal developer experience as IntelliSense isn't engaged immediately and we don't plan on adding any additional parameters to guard and callback functions. We've removed the object wrapper.

// v6
const model = useTabsModel({
onSelect({data: {id}, prevState}) {
console.log(id, prevState);
},
});
// v7
const model = useTabsModel({
onSelect({id}, prevState) {
console.log(id, prevState);
},
});

πŸ€– The codemod will handle this change for you automatically.

Model Implementation

If you don't extend models, you can skip this section.

In v6 we supported TypeScript 3.8 which limited the way types could be inferred and defined. v7 requires TypeScript 4.1 which introduced Template Literal Types. This means guards and callbacks no longer need to be manually defined via an eventMap. Event maps were a stopgap, manual, and prone to errors in defining them. Not all events have guards or callbacks, and there's no way other than manual review to verify their existence. Template Literal Types allow us to properly type guards and callbacks without event maps. The previous types forced data to be an object. We've since dropped that restriction. You can still only pass a single argument to events. If you need additional information, use an object.

This change also allowed us to remove a lot of boilerplate associated with models without sacrificing type safety. This change doesn't affect most use cases, but will affect those who extended a model. We created a new createModelHook utility function to help set up types.

v6
export type MyState = {
value: string;
};
export type MyEvents = {
updateValue(data: {value: string}): void; // enforced that `data` is an object even if we only need to pass a string
};
export type MyModel = Model<MyState, MyEvents>;
export const myEventMap = createEventMap<MyEvents>()({
guards: {
shouldUpdateValue: 'updateValue', // easy to forget or make a mistake on guard name
},
callbacks: {
onUpdateValue: 'updateValue',
},
});
export type MyBaseConfig = {
initialValue?: string;
};
export type MyConfig = MyBaseConfig & Partial<ToModelConfig<MyState, MyEvents, typeof myEventMap>>;
const useMyModel = (config: MyConfig = {}): MyModel => {
const [value, setValue] = React.useState(config.initialValue || '');
const state = {value};
// useEventMap is used to wrap the event object with guards and callbacks according to the event map
const events = useEventMap(myEventMap, state, config, {
updateValue(data) {
setValue(data.value);
},
});
return {state, events};
};
v7
const useMyModel = createModelHook({
defaultConfig: {
initialValue: '',
},
})(config => {
const [value, setValue] = React.useState(config.initialValue); // default is already handled
const state = {value};
const events = {
updateValue(value: string) {
// doesn't need to be an object anymore
setValue(value);
},
};
return {state, events};
});

Note the large reduction in TypeScript type boilerplate. In this example, the only place that TypeScript syntax exists is in the updateValue function definition. This allows better collocating of types and values. Also note that useEventMap is no longer needed. createModelHook will automatically wrap the events returned to call guards and callbacks when appropriate. Today, this is done by creating a new events object. Once we drop IE11 support, this will be done via a proxy instead. createModelHook handles all type inference so you don't need to explicitly type everything. createModelHook also attaches React Context directly to the hook along with defaultConfig and requiredConfig for model extension.

If you extended a model, you'll notice all those types are no longer being exported. You'll have to use this new utility function. Here's an example we found in the wild:

v6
import {
BasePopupModelConfig,
createEventMap,
Model,
popupEventMap,
PopupEvents,
PopupModelConfig,
PopupState,
ToModelConfig,
useCloseOnEscape,
useEventMap,
useFocusTrap,
useInitialFocus,
usePopupModel,
useReturnFocus,
} from '@workday/canvas-kit-react';
type MyModalState = PopupState & {
showOverlay: boolean;
};
type MyModalEvents = PopupEvents;
const myModalEventMap = createEventMap<MyModalEvents>()({
guards: {
...popupEventMap.guards,
},
callbacks: {
...popupEventMap.callbacks,
},
});
type MyBaseModalConfig = BasePopupModelConfig & {
showOverlay?: boolean;
};
type MyModalModel = Model<MyModalState, MyModalEvents>;
type MyConfig = MyBaseConfig &
Partial<ToModelConfig<MyModalState, MyModalEvents, typeof myModalEventMap>>;
export const useMyModalModel = (config: MyConfig = {}): MyModalModel => {
const [showOverlay] = React.useState(config.showOverlay ?? true);
const model = usePopupModel({
...config,
// hook up to a redux store
onShow(...params) {
dispatch(setIsModalOpen(true));
config?.onShow?.(...params);
},
onHide(...params) {
dispatch(setIsModalOpen(false));
config?.onShow?.(...params);
},
});
useInitialFocus(model);
useReturnFocus(model);
useFocusTrap(model);
useCloseOnEscape(model);
const state = {
...model.state,
showOverlay,
};
const events = useEventMap(myEventMap, state, config, {
...model.events,
});
return {state, events};
};
v7
import {
useCloseOnEscape,
useEventMap,
useFocusTrap,
useInitialFocus,
usePopupModel,
useReturnFocus,
} from '@workday/canvas-kit-react';
const useMyModalModel = createModelHook({
defaultConfig: {
...usePopupModel.defaultConfig,
showOverlay: true,
},
requiredConfig: usePopupModel.requiredConfig,
contextOverride: usePopupModel.Context, // needed to make sure this model uses the same context as the popup model, otherwise it will create a new one
})(config => {
// `mergeConfig` takes care of the manual merging we were doing earlier
const model = usePopupModel(
usePopupModel.mergeConfig(config, {
// hook up to a redux store
onShow() {
dispatch(setIsModalOpen(true));
},
onHide() {
dispatch(setIsModalOpen(false));
},
})
);
useInitialFocus(model);
useReturnFocus(model);
useFocusTrap(model);
useCloseOnEscape(model);
const state = {
...model.state,
showOverlay,
};
return {...model, state};
});

We've eliminated the cumbersome type boilerplate and type imports. The code is more focused on your unique logic and less on boilerplate.

Given the complex nature of this code, this change is not handled by the codemod.

Tokens

Depth

Changes:

  • Removed inset depth
  • Added new depth values: none (to remove the default depth from a component), 5 and 6
  • Updated all depth values: depth now adds only box-shadow with two shadows and no border

We've also changed the default depth for the following components:

  • Breadcrumbs (Dropdown Menu): Depth 2 β†’ Depth 3
  • Card: Depth 2 β†’ Depth 1
  • Color Picker (Palette): Depth 2 β†’ Depth 5
  • Combobox: Depth 1 β†’ Depth 3
  • Dialog: Depth 2 β†’ Depth 5
  • Menu: Depth 2 β†’ Depth 3
  • Modal: Depth 2 β†’ Depth 6
  • Popup: Depth 2 β†’ Depth 5
  • Side Panel (Preview, alternate variant): Depth 3 β†’ Depth 5
  • Toast: Depth 2 β†’ Depth 5

Component API

Component Deprecations

Deprecation Types

There are two types of deprecations: soft and hard.

Soft Deprecation

A soft-deprecated component is still available with its full functionality, but it will have been renamed with a prefix to indicate its soft-deprecated status. It will also include a console warning announcing its deprecation. This warning will only be triggered on the component's initial render.

Soft-deprecated types and utilities will also be renamed but generally will not trigger a console warning.

Hard Deprecation

A hard-deprecated component or package is no longer available. You will need to follow the method prescribed in our upgrade guide to update your application. Please reach out to our team directly if you need additional help.

We are hard-deprecating CookieBanner. Please reference this example to migrate away from CookieBanner.

We are hard-deprecating PageHeader. Please reference this example to migrate away from PageHeader.

Header / Global Header

We are hard-deprecating Header. Please reference this example to migrate away from Header.


Component Promotions

We've promoted the following components in v7:

  • Box from @workday/canvas-kit-labs/common to @workday/canvas-kit-react/layout
  • Flex from @workday/canvas-kit-labs/layout to @workday/canvas-kit-react/layout
  • Stack from @workday/canvas-kit-labs/layout to @workday/canvas-kit-react/layout
// v6
import {Box} from '@workday/canvas-kit-labs-react/common';
// v7
import {Box} from '@workday/canvas-kit-react/layout';

πŸ€– The codemod will update imports for these promoted components.

The APIs for these promoted components remain unchanged.


Action Bar

Model

The ActionBar API changed to model API to support more generic behaviors to allow for other components to support responsive layouts using the same models and behaviors. It also allows to implement a responsive layout based on a container width (#1585).

const model = useActionBarModel({
items: [
{
id: 'first',
text: 'First Action',
},
],
});
<ActionBar model={model} />;

Responsive Container Support

The ActionBar component can now handle responsive containers, but the support is not automatic. You must use the dynamic API and provide an overflow menu subcomponent. The dynamic API doesn't know the shape of your object, so render props must be used to instruct React how to render each item.

const [items] = React.useState<MyActionItem[]>([
{
id: 'first',
text: 'First Action',
},
{
id: 'second',
text: 'Second Action',
},
{
id: 'third',
text: 'Third Action',
},
{
id: 'fourth',
text: 'Fourth Action',
},
{
id: 'fifth',
text: 'Fifth Action',
},
]);
const model = useActionBarModel({items});
<ActionBar model={model}>
<ActionBar.List>
{item => <ActionBar.Item onClick={() => console.log(item.id)}>{item.text}</ActionBar.Item>}
</ActionBar.List>
<ActionBar.Menu.Popper>
<ActionBar.Menu.Card maxWidth={300} maxHeight={200}>
<ActionBar.Menu.List>
{item => (
<ActionBar.Menu.Item onClick={() => console.log(item.id)}>
{item.text}
</ActionBar.Menu.Item>
)}
</ActionBar.Menu.List>
</ActionBar.Menu.Card>
</ActionBar.Menu.Popper>
</ActionBar>;

Fixed Position Prop

ActionBar's boolean fixed prop has been removed. It has been replaced by a new position style prop in the ActionBar.List component and is set to fixed by default.

πŸ€– The codemod will remove uses of the fixed prop from ActionBar and restructure component by creating ActionBar.List subcomponent and replacing all ActionBar children to it.


Banner is now a compound component composed of Banner.Icon, Banner.Label, and Banner.ActionText. This allows direct access to the icon, label, and text elements.

// v6
<Banner label="3 Warnings" actionText="Show Details" variant={Banner.Variant.Sticky} error={Banner.ErrorType.Error} />
// v7
<Banner isSticky={true} hasError={true}>
<Banner.Icon />
<Banner.Label>3 Warnings</Banner.Label>
<Banner.ActionText>Show Details</Banner.ActionText>
</Banner>

πŸ€– The codemod will rewrite your JSX to match the new API.

Like all compound components, Banner is written using the createComponent utility from our common module; it supports ref forwarding and using the as prop to change the rendered element.

The variant prop (which previously accepted Banner.Variant.Full or Banner.Variant.Sticky) has been converted to the boolean isSticky prop on the container Banner component.

Similarly, the error prop (which previously accepted Banner.ErrorType.Alert or Banner.ErrorType.Error) has been converted to the boolean hasError prop on Banner. Banner now uses the useThemedPalette hook which allows you to override its colors using the Canvas theme.

The icon is now customizable via the icon prop of Banner.Icon. Previously, the icon was limited to exclamationTriangleIcon and exclamationCircleIcon for the alert and error states, respectively.


Button

Removal of Icon Button

To consolidate Button APIs, we've removed IconButton in favor of SecondaryButton and TertiaryButton. The following table shows how IconButton variants in v6 map to their corresponding buttons in v7.

v6 IconButton variantv7 button (and variant, if necessary)
circle (default variant)TertiaryButton
circleFilledSecondaryButton
inverseTertiaryButton with inverse variant
inverseFilledSecondaryButton with inverse variant
plainUnsupported
squareUnsupported
squareFilledUnsupported

Note: See below for more information about how to manually migrate from unsupported v6 variants.

πŸ€– Use the codemod to migrate your IconButton components in v6 to their corresponding buttons in v7:

// v6
<IconButton icon={plusIcon} />
<IconButton variant="circleFilled" icon={plusIcon} />
<IconButton variant="inverse" icon={plusIcon} />
<IconButton variant="inverseFilled" icon={plusIcon} />
// v7
<TertiaryButton icon={plusIcon} />
<SecondaryButton icon={plusIcon} />
<TertiaryButton variant="inverse" icon={plusIcon} />
<SecondaryButton variant="inverse" icon={plusIcon} />
Unsupported IconButton Variants

In order to simplify our API, we no longer support the plain, square, and squareFilled variants from IconButton.

IconButton components with square, squareFilled and plain variants should be updated to the corresponding icon-only button versions (PrimaryButton, SecondaryButton, and TertiaryButton), ToolbarIconButton, or SegmentedControl. You may use ToolbarIconButton if you would still like to have a square icon that is toggleable.

These changes are not handled by the codemod.

If none of these options support your use case, we've introduced a low-level BaseButton component which allows you to modify the button's colors, size, and other props. For an example of it being used, reference our PageButton component.

Removal of IconButtonProps

The IconButtonProps interface no longer exists now that IconButton has been removed.

This change is not handled by the codemod.

Toggled

There is no equivalent to the IconButton toggled prop in SecondaryButton and TertiaryButton. If you wish to render a button with a toggled state, consider using ToolbarIconButton.

This change is not handled by the codemod.

Icon Position

The iconPosition prop determines where an icon should be rendered relative to the button text. We've updated the values from left and right to start and end respectively to better reflect bidirectionality. The default value is start.

// v6
iconPosition: 'left' | 'right';
// v7
iconPosition: 'start' | 'end';

πŸ€– The codemod will map left to start and right to end for all uses of iconPosition.

iconPosition will have no effect if you're rendering a button with only an icon and no text.

Removal of dataLabel

In order to simplify our API, we've removed the dataLabel prop from PrimaryButton and SecondaryButton.

Given the varied use of dataLabel, this change is not handled by the codemod. Here's an example of how to achieve a similar styling in v7:

// v6
<PrimaryButton dataLabel="1:00">Time</PrimaryButton>;
// v7
import {space, type} from '@workday/canvas-kit-react/common';
const DataLabel = styled('span')({
position: 'relative', // Fixes an IE issue with text within button moving on click
overflow: 'hidden',
whiteSpace: 'nowrap',
fontWeight: type.properties.fontWeights.regular,
marginLeft: space.xxxs,
});
return (
<PrimaryButton>
Time
<DataLabel>1:00</DataLabel>
</PrimaryButton>
);

BaseButton

Disclaimer: We strongly advise consumers not to use BaseButton and to instead rely on PrimaryButton, SecondaryButton and TertiaryButton whenever possible. BaseButton is strictly provided as a last resort if no other option is available for your use case.

As part of our Button restructuring, we've created a low level BaseButton component. This component isn't intended to be used outside of Canvas Kit, but we do export it for very specific use cases. BaseButton is a styled <button> element which supports style properties such as colors, padding, and width among many others.

Here's an example:

import * as React from 'react';
import {colors} from '@workday/canvas-kit-react/tokens';
import {BaseButton} from '@workday/canvas-kit-react/button';
import {plusIcon} from '@workday/canvas-system-icons-web';
const getBasicButtonColors = () => {
return {
default: {
background: colors.blueberry400,
label: colors.frenchVanilla100,
icon: colors.frenchVanilla100,
},
hover: {
background: colors.blueberry500,
label: colors.frenchVanilla100,
icon: colors.frenchVanilla100,
},
active: {
background: colors.blueberry500,
label: colors.frenchVanilla100,
icon: colors.frenchVanilla100,
},
focus: {
background: colors.blueberry400,
label: colors.frenchVanilla100,
icon: colors.frenchVanilla100,
},
disabled: {
background: colors.blueberry400,
},
};
};
export type BasicButtonProps = React.ButtonHTMLAttributes<HTMLButtonElement> & {};
export const BasicButton = ({children, ...elemProps}: BasicButtonProps) => {
return (
<BaseButton
colors={getPaginationButtonColors()}
{...elemProps}
>
<BaseButton.Label>{children}</BaseButton.Label>
<BaseButton.Icon icon={plusIcon}>
</BaseButton>
);
};

BaseButton uses our Box component under the hood, which allows it to accept a variety of style properties. Because of the flexibility of this component, consumers can use it to create toggled buttons or other buttons that aren't supported by our standard button components.


Icon

We've updated AccentIcon, AppletIcon, Graphic, Icon, Svg, SystemIcon, and SystemIconCircle to use the createComponent utility from our common module; they now support ref forwarding and using the as prop to change the rendered element.

These components previously supported an iconRef prop. In v7, you'll need to use ref instead of iconRef:

// v6
<SystemIcon iconRef={ref} />;
// v7
<SystemIcon ref={ref} />;

πŸ€– The codemod will update all Icon components that previously supported iconRef to use ref instead.


Popper

We've removed the containerElement prop from Popper because it's no longer needed with the Fullscreen API.


Popup.Card

Popup.Card components (this includes Modal.Card and Dialog.Card) are now flexbox containers. This was done to support overflowing content (by default, the Popup.Body component). The card is a vertical flexbox container and Popup.Heading, Popup.Body, and any other children are flex items. Popup.Body now has overflow-y: auto to naturally allow the body content to overflow in a scroll container. This is a breaking change if your Popup, Modal, or Dialog doesn't work with a flexbox with flex-direction: column. In most cases, this shouldn't matter. If this change does cause your popup to display incorrectly, you may need to play around with flex item containers.

Here's an example of where your current implementation might break. A common Modal has a heading, body, and footer (Cancel/Submit buttons). If the Cancel and Submit buttons are direct children of the Modal.Card like the following...

<Modal.Card>
<Modal.Heading>Some Heading</Modal.Heading>
<Modal.Body>Some Body</Modal.Body>
<SecondaryButton>Cancel</SecondaryButton>
<PrimaryButton>Submit</PrimaryButton>
</Modal.Card>

...the buttons will become vertical flex items instead of the default which is displaying inline-block. Before v7, the buttons would layout next to each other horizontally. In v7, the buttons will stack vertically. To fix this, you'll need to add another element as a flex item in the Modal.Card. The following example uses HStack to achieve the desired horizontal layout:

<Modal.Card>
<Modal.Heading>Some Heading</Modal.Heading>
<Modal.Body>Some Body</Modal.Body>
<HStack spacing="s">
<SecondaryButton>Cancel</SecondaryButton>
<PrimaryButton>Submit</PrimaryButton>
</HStack>
</Modal.Card>

If your code contains any hacks to make a Modal overflow, those hacks should now be removed. This example shows how body content overflows (you may have to limit your browser height to see the overflow). Before v7, you had to manually set the max-height of the Modal.Body element using calculations. These should now be removed. The Popup.Card now has a max height and the Popup.Body height is automatically calculated.

Popup.Body

Popup.Body is now an overflow container. This means two things:

  • Popup.Body will scroll if the contents are too big to fit in the page
  • Popup.Body will hide focus rings that render outside the overflow container

Our examples contained buttons inside the Body element with their focus rings cut off. We fixed this by moving the buttons outside the Body element. This is most likely the desired structure anyway since the buttons will no longer scroll with overflowed Body content.

// v6
<Modal.Card>
<Modal.Body>
Body Contents
<HStack spacing="s">
{/* Will scroll with the body */}
<Modal.CloseButton as={PrimaryButton}>Delete</Modal.CloseButton>
<Modal.CloseButton>Cancel</Modal.CloseButton>
</HStack>
</Modal.Body>
</Modal.Card>
// v7
<Modal.Card>
<Modal.Body>Body Contents</Modal.Body>
<HStack spacing="s">
<Modal.CloseButton as={PrimaryButton}>Delete</Modal.CloseButton>
<Modal.CloseButton>Cancel</Modal.CloseButton>
</HStack>
</Modal.Card>

In addition to the other Model Changes, the show and hide events of all disclosure-type models have been updated to remove the extra event wrapper. This change allows developers to directly attach the show and hide events to React event handlers.

The following models were affected:

  • useDisclosureModel
  • usePopupModel
  • useModalModel
  • useDisclosureModel
// v6
<button onClick={() => model.events.show()} /> // most use-cases look like this
<button onClick={event => model.events.show({event})} />
// v7
<button onClick={model.events.show} />

Removing the object wrapper around the event allows us to directly pass the show or hide event to the onClick handler which is much more convenient. We couldn't find many uses of the event in the wild, so the impact will be minimal. Most usage of show or hide events are called without event, so this change will not impact most people. There is no codemod for this change, because the usage is very difficult to detect since most people pass a callback that doesn't take parameters.

Guards and callback signatures have also changed to remove the object wrapper around the event. The following v6 example includes the Model Changes which this change compounds upon.

// v6
const model = usePopupModel({
shouldShow({data: {event}, state}) {
console.log(event, state);
},
onShow({data: {event}, prevState}) {
console.log(event, prevState);
},
});
// v7
const model = usePopupModel({
shouldShow(event, state) {
console.log(event, state);
},
onShow(event, prevState) {
console.log(event, prevState);
},
});

πŸ€– The codemod will update all inline guards and callbacks defined like they are in this example. If a guard or callback was defined outside the model config block, it will not be covered by the codemod.


Segmented Control

SegmentedControl is now a compound component.

Given the removal of IconButton in v7, you'll now need to use SegmentedControl.Button instead.

// v6
<SegmentedControl value={value} onChange={handleToggle}>
<IconButton
icon={listViewIcon}
value="list-view"
aria-label="List View"
onClick={e => console.log('Existing IconButton onClick callback')}
/>
<IconButton icon={worksheetsIcon} value="table-view" aria-label="Table View" disabled={true} />
<IconButton icon={deviceTabletIcon} value="device-view" aria-label="Device View" />
<IconButton icon={percentageIcon} value="percent-view" aria-label="Percent View" />
</SegmentedControl>
// v7
<SegmentedControl value={value} onChange={handleToggle}>
<SegmentedControl.Button
icon={listViewIcon}
value="list-view"
aria-label="List View"
onClick={e => console.log('Existing IconButton onClick callback')}
/>
<SegmentedControl.Button
icon={worksheetsIcon}
value="table-view"
aria-label="Table View"
disabled={true}
/>
<SegmentedControl.Button icon={deviceTabletIcon} value="device-view" aria-label="Device View" />
<SegmentedControl.Button icon={percentageIcon} value="percent-view" aria-label="Percent View" />
</SegmentedControl>

πŸ€– The codemod will replace all IconButton children of SegmentedControl with SegmentedControl.Button.


Side Panel

The SidePanel in our Preview package now has a tooltip built in to its toggle button. If you currently have a Tooltip component wrapping this component, you should remove it. Instead, you'll need to provide the appropriate tooltip text to the button based on its state using the following new props added to SidePanel.ToggleButton:

/**
* The tooltip text to expand the side panel
* @default 'Expand'
*/
tooltipTextExpand?: string;
/**
* The tooltip text to collapse the side panel
* @default 'Collapse'
*/
tooltipTextCollapse?: string;

Status Indicator

Status Indicators currently truncate when they reach their max width of 150px. After receiving requests to increase this value, we've increased it by 33% to 200px.

We've also added a maxWidth prop to further configure this value if necessary. While this increases flexibility, please keep in mind that status text should be short, direct, and preferably a single word.

<StatusIndicator label="Slightly Longer Status" type={StatusIndicator.Type.Gray} maxWidth={250} />

Tabs

To avoid interference with the HTML name attribute, we're now using data-id instead of name for Tabs.Item, Tabs.Panel, and Tabs.Menu.Item.

// v6
<Tabs.Item name="tabs-item">...</Tabs.Item>
<Tabs.Panel name="tabs-panel">...</Tabs.Panel>
<Tabs.Menu.Item name="tabs-menu-item">...</Tabs.Menu.Item>
// v7
<Tabs.Item data-id="tabs-item">...</TabsItem>
<Tabs.Panel data-id="tabs-panel">...</Tabs.Panel>
<Tabs.Menu.Item data-id="tabs-menu-item">...</Tabs.Menu.Item>

πŸ€– The codemod will handle these changes for you automatically.

Can't Find What You Need?

Check out our FAQ section which may help you find the information you're looking for.

FAQ Section